Collages

by Celine Semaan Vernon

Our dear friend Abraham Zeitoun's gorgeous work for Slow Factory highlighting our Petit Atlas Collection in partnership with the World Wildlife Fund.

 





Filed under: art artwork collage design wwf

Everyday is Earth Day

by Celine Semaan Vernon


This is not a Manifesto. This is in honor of Earth Day + Fashion Revolution Day. 
Once upon a time, the first humans were beginning to adapt and survive on Planet Earth. In a short amount of centuries, humans took over the Planet and began to manipulate their environment. Today, we realize that Earth's resources aren't infinite but finite. This is a picture of the last rhino alive. 


And over here is an image of the last Eastern Cougar. 
From the New York Times article declaring it was extinct;

Either way, the “Eastern” cougar as such is no longer with us. Any recent sightings in the cougar’s historic range, which stretched from eastern Ontario and Michigan eastward to Maine and southward to Georgia, Tennessee and Missouri, were actually sightings of its relatives, the Fish and Wildlife Service said.

“It’s extinct,” said Mark McCollough, a wildlife biologist with the agency’s offices in Maine, referring to the official determination by his agency.

“But it’s not?” he was asked.

“But it’s not,” he confirmed. “It may well return to part of its range.”

 

 

So we believe in change. We take a stand and believe that a) things can last, and we make it our mission to have everything part of Slow Factory have meaning, utility and come from natural fabrics and paper so that it can bio degrade not harming the planet. b) things can be made consciously and we can chose to change our behavior towards consumption and consume wisely by contributing to a network of good causes that will - at the end of the day - make a positive change in this world.

 

Join us in our efforts to preserve our planet with the WWF.

Filed under: art conscious earth day fashion fashion revolution meaningful sustainable

Olafur Eliasson: Imagine Yourself as an Asteroid

by Alyse Archer-Coite

  

Contact is Eliasson's first solo show in France since that pivotal exhibition at MAM, and only the second solo exhibition presented at the Fondation Louis Vuitton. 

"First imagine that you are an asteroid," Olafur Eliasson's voice intones purposefully. "Focus on the feeling of floating through space and try to be present in that idea." He pauses. "Now be aware of your asteroid self and at the same time the endless space around you." He continues, encouraging you, the listener, to experience the artworks as other asteroids, sliding by you as you continue on your asteroidal trajectory. "Now you have familiarized yourself with the possibility oforbiting through the exhibition," he concludes.

 

 

The exhibition revolves around two large-scale, circular installations. In the first,Map for unthought thoughts, a light source situated on the floor of the gallery illuminates a lattice structure that casts a choreography of shadows across the wall, with the viewers' bodies playing an integral role in the dynamic interplay of shadows. A mirrored wall completes the illusion of an entirely circular space. InContact's second installation viewers encounter a sloping floor, emulating a planetary curve, and a bright, golden horizon line, reminiscent of a celestial eclipse. In a transitional space set between the installations the space titled Double Infinityforms a passageway in the shape of the infinity symbol, with two portholes on either end, perhaps suggesting the looping pathways of electrons or satellites, the future and the past, or the grip of space. 

If you are in Paris, take a trip down asteroid lane...

Foundation Louis Vuitton, 8 Avenue du Mahatma Gandhi, 75116 Paris, France

 

 

Filed under: art asteroid contemporary art exploration imagine Louis Vuitton museum nasa Olufar Eliasson science space

Featured on Scientific American

by Celine Semaan Vernon

Karyn Traphagen was the first to wear the Terra Modis dress at the ScienceOnline conference. Shortly after that, Glendon Mellow interviewed our founder Celine Semaan Vernon for the Scientific American blog!

  • Where does your studio name Slow Factory come from?

I imagined our store floating in space next to the satellites and printing directly from space :). We are also part of the Slow Fashion Movement which means we are a sustainable business, we almost print and make according to our demand, we run limited editions and sell out of them very quickly. Only after that do we start a new production with natural fabrics sourced from India from a socially and environmentally responsible company, and the garments are made between Montreal and New York. It’s not a fast-paced process. It takes time to make things right. And for the worms to make silk, it takes time too. :)

  • What’s the loftiest language you could use to describe the NASA and satellite  images being worn on clothing?

To me it almost spiritual, to wrap yourself with the Universe, with the Earth. The nature of the Universe facilitates meditation, I personally find peace of mind looking at these images. That is how it all started. And what can be a better way to remind ourselves of the beauty we are surrounded with? I believe this thought keeps us open-minded and kinder.

  • What’s the fastest, coolest soundbite you could use?

I’m not sure I understand this question..

  • Fair enough!  Besides I came up with one that’s now the title of this blog post. You describe yourself as a “Creative Commoner of the soul”. How important is it to you to get images out into the world that are under Creative Commons? Why wouldn’t you be more protective of the images?

Is there a point to try to lock these images down under a copy right license? They belong the to the World. Even if I tried to limit their use, I might only cause more harm both to myself and to culture. I believe that Everything is a Remix. In fashion, there are no copy rights, only trade marks on the Logos: the creativity in fashion, the trends, the culture and sub-cultures are so rich! In music the copy-rights are creating more harm then good, because now that we have entered the loss of the physical support for music, how do we monetize on it? There needs to be a new way to think about making money that is not based on limited the use. What inspires me is the act of generosity. That what is fuels science, culture and the arts in general. Why try to limit the use and therefore limit creativity? What good does this serve the humanity?

  • What image would you never put on a dress? (Personal aesthetic reasons, political, etc)

The image of war.

  • Karyn Traphagen is one of the great science connectors of our time. How important is it to you that the dresses and clothing spark conversations?

Without conversation, the dress doesn’t exist. That is how important it is to me to have it seen, worn, re-appropriated, styled, owned. Its story will be heard only when it raises enough awareness that we all shift our thinking from the mindset of using the Earth to respecting the Earth and reconnecting with its energy so that we protect it and slow down on the extraction of oil and tar sands. It is an alarm bell just like so many others. The more we ring them, the more they’ll be heard. As a humanity, and to reconnect with our surrounding and creating new ways to reuse energy. Science is the breath of progress.

You can read the full interview here.

 

X

Filed under: art co-creation dress earth environmentally friendly fashion global warming interview science science life scienceonline scientific american terra modis valerie dumaine

Slowfactory and Valerie Dumaine

by Celine Semaan Vernon

VALÉRIE DUMAINE + SLOWFACTORY SPECIAL COLLABORATION

Greenland brings together the vision and designs of Valérie Dumaine with the innovative concepts and open-culture philosophy of Creative Commons advocate Celine Semaan, founder of Slowfactory.com.

 

These two limited edition items feature stunning NASA images of the world’s largest iceberg showing the Arctic ice melting as an effect of global warming.

 

 

 

Photos by Sylvain Blais.

Sea ice swirls in ocean currents off the east coast of Greenland on Aug. 17, 2012, as seen by the MODIS instrument on board the Terra satellite. Greenland's ice sheet and outlet glaciers can also be seen at left.

NASA and the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) announced on Aug. 27, 2012, that the ice cap covering the Arctic Ocean is now smaller than ever recorded since consistent satellite measurements of the ice began more than three decades ago. Each year, the ice cap goes through a shrink-and-swell cycle, melting throughout the summer months before expanding through fall and winter. In the past decade in particular the minimum summertime extent of the ice cap has shown a consistent decline in size – a trend closely linked with the Arctic's warming climate. NASA and NSIDC scientists said the extent of Arctic sea ice on Aug. 26 surpassed the previous record minimum extent set in the summer of 2007. The ice cap will continue to melt and get smaller in the coming weeks before temperatures get colder and ice begins to refreeze as fall approaches.

 

Available for pre-order soon!

Fabric 100% silk
Sizes available: XS-S-M-L

Made in between Montreal and New York with love

 

Filed under: art dress earth hubble launch limited nasa prints silk space valerie dumaine